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A Bird’s-eye View of Fashion in Finland

Design has been a part of the Finnish identity for a long time now. Finland takes pride in its design, especially when it is recognized outside the country. Design is normally adapted to time and place, but fashion as a branch of design is very fleeting. Its worth is not only ascertained by fashion professionals, but also by the people who patronize it.

Pure and clear postmodern designs predominate fashion in Finland. While the adjectives seem particular, they are by no means reserved only to Finnish style. They are worldwide trends and an essential aspect of Scandinavian style.

Some elements can be actually uniquely Finnish, though. Finnish couturiers are often inspired by nature. It is, however, more evident in classic fashion than in current fashion. This can be pinned on the international shift for more conceptual and abstract inspirations. Modern fashion deems references which are too explicit inelegant and dull.

Individualism is another differentiating trait of Finnish fashion design. Finnish designers look to create specific fashion for stylish individuals and not for the hoi polloi. It is a highly restrictive gimmick which greatly lessens the target audience. In summary, fashion in Finland is more about artistry and style rather than boosting revenues. The upside is that the Finnish fashion industry is more compelling and diverse compared to some of their competitors.

Finnish fashion also subscribes to globally appreciated values like morality and renewability. At its core is the understanding that the garment will be able to withstand time. Moreover, Finnish designers set their sights on giving their seamstresses a secure and equitable working environment. Their overseas factory cannot be situated in a country infamous for exploitative business practices.

Viewpoints and notions vary on the present state of the Finnish fashion business. There are pundits who criticize it as frozen and exclusionary while others think otherwise. Whatever the truth may be, the Finnish fashion industry is faring very well. Exporting the garments can be very problematic with styles that are bound to ideas, brands and time. One design only has a shelf life of six months and caters only to a certain market because of its higher price tag and radical design.

Like other business enterprises, the fashion industry is dependent on the law of supply and demand. When a consumer needs something, he or she undergoes a process of decision-making before coming up with an answer whether to purchase or not the product. Everybody needs clothes.

The problem staring Finnish fashion companies is that the local market cannot sustain all of them but expanding internationally requires a lot of work and money. As hard as it is to enter foreign markets, it is doubly so for fashion companies with products that are vulnerable to many factors and the period they were made.

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